changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Ryan and Deci's Three Intrinsic Needs

 

Explanations > Needs > Ryan and Deci's Three Intrinsic Needs

Competence | Autonomy | Relatedness |  So what?

 

In their Self-Determination Theory, Ryan and Deci (2000) identify three needs as being factors at the core of intrinsic motivation. If these are needs are suitably satisfied, this will help the person towards optimal function and growth.

Competence

We want to be good at the things we do and especially like to be the best at something. The harder and more respected the subject where we have competence, the more we value this. There is a wonderful 'buzz' when we achieve a challenge.

Negative feedback acts to reduce a person's sense of competence, while praise can boost it.

This need is related to needs for esteem and identity.

Autonomy

We want to be free to do whatever we choose so we feel a sense of harmony with our inner self and life purpose. To do this, we need at least resources to do the job and possibly empowered authority and support also. We dislike a heavy hand of control from others with factors such as deadlines, and may actively rebel against this.

Deci found that offering extrinsic rewards for actions that are intrinsically motivated undermines autonomy and decreases intrinsic motivation.

This need is related to needs for power and control.

Relatedness

We are social animals and like to connect with others, to work with them, to care for them and have fruitful relationships with them.

This need is related to needs for connection and mating.

So what?

Note how these needs are different to other needs and remember that the focus here is on intrinsic needs. Competence and autonomy seem related as having autonomy allows competence to be used. Relatedness is more of a social need.

See also

McClelland's Acquired Needs Theory

 

Ryan, R.M. and Deci, E.L. (2000). Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions and New Directions, Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 54–67.

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

+ Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-2016
Massive Content — Maximum Speed