changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Stereotyping

 

Explanations > Thinking > Stereotyping

Description | Example | Discussion | So what?

 

Description

When thinking about people we often default to stereotype thinking, assuming a person who meets certain criteria will conform to a limited set of descriptors as embodied in traditional or our own personal stereotypes.

As a result of such thinking, we think about and people in ways that they do not deserve, or simply view them as one-dimensional when they have a far more complex character than we assume.

Example

I go to buy a car, assuming the salesperson will be arrogant and pushy. I base my negotiation on hard dealing and am wrong-footed when he is patient and thoughtful.

A woman avoids dating male engineers, assuming they are socially awkward. When she eventually goes out with one, her assumptions are confirmed. However, she finds that the guy is also funny and good-hearted, enough for her to agree to go on another date.

Discussion

In order to cope with the data inflow we simplify and pattern-match most of what we meet, including people, even though we know ourselves to be far more complex than this. Oddly, we do not notice that, while we consider ourselves complex and nuanced, we seldom afford other people the same grace.

Stereotypes are often shared socially and are used as a means of indicate out-groups that can dismissed ad 'not like us'.

Forcing people into stereotypes is insulting and could lose you a helpful contact. Stereotyping can also underestimate possible opponents in such as negotiations.

So what?

When meeting others, beware of categorizing them according to pre-held stereotypes. This can lead to difficult misunderstanding. By visibly not stereotyping those who easily fall into categories, you can befriend them or gain their trust.

Beware of others stereotyping you. Act outside their expectations to show you are different. Or play to the stereotype if you want to lull them into a false sense of security.

See also

Stereotypes

 

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

You can buy books here

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Look inside

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

* Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-
Massive Content — Maximum Speed