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Important Early Sales Lessons

 

Guest articles > Important Early Sales Lessons

 

by: Daniel Milstein

 

Does failure really make us better people? Bill Gates' first venture with Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen was called Traf-O-Data and it was not a big success. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team. There are many other such stories, which gave me some consolation when I faced my own missteps as a loan originator.

My first two mortgage brokerage failures were major setbacks that I took personally. However, I realized those experiences ultimately could help me become a successful business professional and a better person. It is a lesson that impatient loan officers, insurance salesmen, Realtors, and others who seek to be top salespeople should appreciate. I recall writing brief notes about the lessons I learned during this period. These 'essential truths' still resonate with me:

  • Don't believe your success will be measured by what you have done before. Instead, it will be gauged by what you are able to do in the future.
  • Take any slumps in sales volume as a time to learn more about the business, to reinvent the way you sell and to practice your techniques.
  • Impatience can temporarily blind you to your goals. Simply because you aren't doing well at the beginning, does not mean you aren't cut out for the job. It just means you need to be patient and take time to improve yourself.
  • By focusing too much on the problem, you lose the ability to find your way to a solution.

With any setback because opportunity. Never take a failure personally, use it to become more successful in your craft. All of my setbacks have made me a better salesperson and a better person in general.

 


Daniel Milstein is the bestselling author of ABC of Sales. For more information, visit: http://amzn.to/ABCARTICLES.


Contributor: Daniel Milstein

Published here on:

Classification: Sales

Website: http://amzn.to/ABCARTICLES

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