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Spill and Fill

 

Disciplines > Change Management > Creating Change > Spill and Fill

Method | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Method

When you are starting up a new organization and closing down an old organization, do this in a tapered way, moving a few people over at a time. Be careful here with your best people: they both need to be involved in setting up the new organization and also nursing the old organization to its grave, ensuring a smooth handover.

If you can, do the move in planned phases of activity, proving each new part before you move people over to the next phase.

Example

A manufacturer is closing down one production line and opening up another. They start by moving only a few key people over to get the new line set up. They then move more to prototype and prove the operational processes. Then they slow down the old line as they move people over to start up the new line. As the new line gains speed, people are continually moved across.

Some of the best people are retained on the old line to keep it going to the end and to work in the various different roles that are left open. They are rewarded with a bonus for their loyalty and given good roles when they finally move over.

Discussion

This approach does not suit all change situations -- it works only where there is a move between two organizations, and when this move can be done gradually.

A benefit of this approach is being able to provide a smooth change. This is particularly important if both organizations are delivering a product or service to a single customer base. The stepwise approach also allows each new change to be trialed and proven before the next stage. Doing a change all in one can be rather risky, as failure of the new organization can be disastrous.

See also

 

 

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