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ADMO

 

Disciplines > Communication > ADMO

Attraction | Detection | Motivation | Outcome | See also

 

ADMO is an abbreviation for four domain phases of a persuasive message.

Attraction

The attraction domain uses form and visual appeal to grab the attention of the person.

The form has symbolism that may create attentional priority, for example where a heavy manila envelope is seen as more important than a cheap brown envelope.

Visual appeal includes contrastive differentiation to make the message stand out. For example a red envelope might be used or a regally impressive crest.

Detection

The detection domain includes the subject of the message, readability of words, and the graphic treatment that creates visual stimulus and subtle persuasion.

The subject needs to be something that continues the attraction, leading the person to read the message and absorb the surrounding visual style. Readability includes clarity of language, size and style of font, length of sentences and so on. Graphic treatment includes visual decoration and informative graphs and charts. Pictures of people can be helpful here, prompting the reader to join them.

Motivation

For the person who has now detected the message, the motivation domain includes assurances of source credibility and addresses the reader's self-interest.

Source credibility is important when the reader is being asked to trust the truth of the message, which may be enhanced with quotes and references from well-known other people or organizations.

Self-interest includes a consideration of WIIFM and WAMI: What's In It For Me and What's Against My Interests.

Outcome

The outcome domain shows whether the person has been persuaded and has internalized the message that leads to behavior change (and not rejection of the message).

Internalization occurs when the person bonds with the message, taking it to associate with their inner identity. If a person becomes the message, then change in behavior will appear only natural to them.

If there is rejection, then this should be understood in order to change the communication for a subsequent message.

See also

AIDA

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