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The Value of Context

 

DisciplinesMarketing > Pricing > The Value of Context

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Where you sell something is as important as what you are selling. The whole context can make a difference, including lighting, furniture, and even smells. The dress and attitude of sales people also, of course, is important, as is anyone else that customer meet.

If you can, plan and prepare for closing the deal, enveloping a customer in a total environment with a minimum of distractions. In a store, it can help if you can take them to a focus area. If you have to sell at their workplace, take things like brochures and demonstration models that create a mini-context within the room. You may even adapt the room, such as pulling in a light.

Example

A high-end car sales organization uses an opulent showroom, with comfortable seating, free drinks and constant attention.

A sales person often takes customers to a lovely restaurant to close the deal.

A company uses a smart, enveloping stand at trade shows to enhance their brand and pricing strategy.

Discussion

Context is often forgotten as the focus is put on the process. Yet it has a deep and important effect. In experiments, the same meal served at a nice restaurant and a corner cafe was rated as far better in the restaurant environment. Wine in a bottle with an expensive label is rated as better than the same wine in a cheap bottle. Even the smallest contextual factor can have a surprising difference.

One of the best examples of total environments is casinos. There are no windows to indicate time of day. Temperature is so comfortable it is not noticed. Lighting is varied, not just flat, with greater intensity in key areas. Food and drink is easily available. Customers are observed closely and attention provided when it seems it is needed and before customers ask. A whole stream of steady nudges are applied to keep them spending.

See also

Closing Techniques

 

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