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Pearl Harbor strategy

 

Explanations > Politics > Pearl Harbor strategy

Description | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Start your campaign slowly and weakly, whilst both carefully researching your opponent and building your own strengths. Then when they have dismissed you as ineffective and turned their backs on you and lowered their defenses, pick your moment and attack hard and without mercy.

Discussion

The name 'Pearl Harbor' of course comes from the famous Japanese attack on the sleeping American military machine in the second world war. Their opening salvo severely weakened the USA capability in the region and gave the Japanese the upper hand for several years.

The strategy of appearing weak or unwilling to fight makes the opponent feel safe and that they can turn their attentions elsewhere. In doing so, they may unwittingly give you information or access that you can turn to your advantage.

An effective way this strategy can be used is when there are several powerful players. If you appear weak, they will ignore you whilst they attack and steadily weaken one another. When they are all on their knees or their battle is over, you can emerge and may not even have to fight them as you are seen as fresh and untainted.

See also

Crippling warfare strategy

 

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