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Control Classroom Entry

 

Disciplines > Teaching > Classroom management > Control Classroom Entry

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Do not let students into the classroom before you. Let them enter in single file and sit at their seats in silence until the whole class is seated. Pause for a moment to ensure silence and then begin your lesson.

You can start by ensuring they are quiet outside the room before they come in. If necessary, keep them outside for the whole lesson. Some may like this idea, so if they keep you outside for any significant time, be sure there are additional consequences, such as letters to parents or staying in during breaks.

If they start talking after they have come into the room, stop entry of others and send them all out of the room to start again.

You should only need to do this a few times at the start of term before they get the message.

Example

Right, before we go in, I want everyone to be quiet. You enter my classroom in silence and you stay quiet until we start the lesson. Michael Fitz do you understand. Good ... Right, now Teri, please lead into the room. ... Michael, please stand with me and let everyone else in first. ...

Discussion

Depending on where you are teaching, controlling entry may or may not be possible. As an alternative, you can control your entry into the room. You can stand in the doorway or in front of the class until they are quiet. You can send them all out to start again. You can say 'I want to enter a quiet classroom' and walk out (if necessary, returning with the head teacher).

Starting as you mean to continue is a good basic rule and this can be reinforced in any lesson. This establishes your authority and that they must obey you even in small items like how they enter the classroom.

See also

Authority principle

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