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Cheek body language

 

Techniques > Use of body language > Parts-of-the-body language > Cheek body language

In-out | Redness | Internal | TouchingSee also

 

Cheeks can speak body language, although admittedly not very much.

In-out

Cheeks can be drawn in or blown out. When pulled in and particularly when linked with pursed lips, it indicates disapproval.

Cheeks sucked in to the extent that the lower lips curl can indicate pensiveness which may be uncomfortable (look also for a furrowed brow).

When cheeks are blown out, this can signify uncertainty as to what to do next (watch also for raised eyebrows and rounded eyes). This may be exaggerated by the person actually blowing air from their mouth ('Pfoof - what do I do now??').

Blown out cheeks can also be a sign of exhaustion. If the person has been exercising the face may also be red and sweaty.

Redness

Red cheeks is a classic sign of embarrassment. Watch for them becoming red (some people just have natural red cheeks). Red cheeks may also be a sign of anger. Watch here for other anger signs, such as enlarged and staring eyes.

Cheeks pale when blood drains from them. This typically happens when a person is frightened as the blood is moved to the muscles in readiness to flee. Pale cheeks can also be a sign of coldness.

Internal

Chewing the inside of the cheek or mouth can be a hidden sign of nervousness and may indicate lying.

Pushing the tongue into the cheek can show pensiveness as the person thinks about something and tries to come to a decision.

Touching

The cheek is a wide area that can be touched without obscuring any of the functional organs. Touching the cheek is often done in surprise or horror. A light touch, along with an open mouth that says 'Oooh' indicate light surprise. Touching both cheeks with the flat of the palm is an exaggeration of this and may indicate horror.

See also

Tongue body language, Lips body language

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