changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Encouragement signals

 

Techniques > Conversation techniques > Encouragement signals

Enthusiasm for the subject | Interest in the person | Non-verbal signals | See also

 

Sometimes all you want to do is to encourage people to talk about what ever is on their mind. This is useful in general social situation or when you want to give them time and space to get out something that is bothering them but they currently do not want to talk about.

An important way you encourage others is in the signals you send, both via the words you use and also the non-verbal signals.

Enthusiasm for the subject

Enthusiasm is infectious! If you are excited by the subject in question, the other person will pick up on this. It also signals that you are ready to talk more about the subject.

If you get enthusiastic about something that they are clearly interested in, then this shows a clear common ground on which you can both engage in a fascinating and enthralling conversation.

The reverse is also true. If you are obviously bored, then the other person may either be infected by your boredom too, or be less likely to expose their own enthusiasm for the subject.

Interest in the person

Show interest not only in the subject but also in the person. Indicate that you care about them. 

Non-verbal signals

You do not need to say anything to encourage people to keep talking. Here are a few things you can do to keep them talking, as well as using other body language, such as:

  • Silence: Nature abhors a vacuum and so do people. Stay quiet and they will fill the gap.
  • Raised eyebrows: Raise one or both (if you can't do one) eyebrows expectantly.
  • Tilted head: Tilt your head sideways, perhaps in combination with the eyebrow-raise.
  • Nod: Nodding shows agreement and interest.
  • Noises: Make encouraging noises, such as 'uh-huh', 'mm', etc.

See also

Using Body Language, Questioning techniques, Signals

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

You can buy books here

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Look inside

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

* Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-2016
Massive Content — Maximum Speed