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Draw Conclusions Yourself

 

Techniques General persuasion > The Art of Being Right > Draw Conclusions Yourself

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

When you have elicited all your premisses, and your opponent has admitted them, you must refrain from asking him for the conclusion, but draw it at once for yourself; nay, even though one or other of the premisses should be lacking, you may take it as though it too had been admitted, and draw the conclusion. This trick is an application of the fallacy non causae ut causae.

Example

Yes, we have no bananas, and the deliveries are not in yet. So it's carrot soup on the menu, then.

...so because the heating is intermittent and the weather is getting colder, we should visit James for a week.

Discussion

The most important part of any logical argument is the final conclusion. Indeed, it is the main part that is used to suggest an action or change of some kind. A supporting rationale is, in the end, only important for proof. But if you can establish the conclusion and decision without necessarily having a perfect proof, then the actual logic of the rationale is unimportant.

In arguments, people often start with the rationale and may spend time developing their argument. This gives you the opportunity to jump in with a conclusion that suits your purpose. As it appears you have used their evidence, it makes it difficult for them to challenge your conclusion.

'Non causae ut causae' is a phrase coined by Schopenhauer and indicates that the fallacy is in using reasons that are not valid. This can happen when a conclusion is true but he reasons given for it are not true or not sufficient to draw the conclusion.

'Draw Conclusions Yourself' is the twentieth of Schopenhauer's stratagems.

See also

Making the argument

 

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