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Predict Future Rightness

 

Techniques General persuasion > Being Right > Predict Future Rightness

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Say that, even though you may not be right now, you will be proved right in the future.

This is particularly applicable when you are making predictions and giving warnings that others dismiss as unlikely, and even more so when predictions you have made in the past have not come true.

You can support this approach with examples of where you have been proved right in the past and had the last laugh when others have thought you wrong.

Example

Well it may not be true now, but you just wait. You'll see.

Nobody believes the harbinger. But mark my words, I know it will all end in tears.

I cannot predict dates with certainty, but I do know that this will happen sooner or later.

Discussion

We all predict the future, sometimes naively so, and also want others to believe what we predict. There is story about a child in school who when asked by her teacher what she was drawing, she said 'God'. When the teacher pointed out that nobody knew what God looks like, the child replied, without looking up, 'They will soon'.

We also seek the confidence of certainty about the future and will easily accept the predictions of others, especially if they offer their forecasts with an air of authority. Once we have accepted their authority we are then loathe to be proved wrong and so we also tend to accept excuses of authority figures, even when these excuses are rather flimsy.

This is also a method used by business consultants who forecast problems for their clients and thereby get asked to help (at a good price, of course). If you predict problems and your ability to avoid them, then when they do not happen, you can claim a success. The 'Y2K' fuss around the millennium was an example of this.

See also

Prediction

 

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