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Transitioning

 

Techniques Public speaking > Speaking Tips > Transitioning

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Transitioning is about moving between two segments of the presentation or changing from one position to another.

Closure of the current position can be achieved with a mini-summary (or internal summary), similar to what you might do at the end of the presentation. Another approach is to simply tell them that you have completed the segment.

Opening the next part of the presentation is likewise a similar mini-introduction (or internal preview) and can include such as a description of what is to be covered or a provocative question.

It can help also if there is some linkage given in this, showing the logic of why and how one section follows another.

Example

Now that we've seen the problem, let's consider what we can do about it.

I can see you have a good point and we'll pick up more in the next section on semantic analysis.

So that's Attribution Theory. But what about Expectation?

Discussion

The critical principles of transitioning are closure and opening.

The first step is to close down the previous point, creating cognitive and emotional closure for the audience so they are ready to let go of this and start again with a new (and possibly linked) section of your presentation.

The next step is to open the subsequent section of the presentation by creating a new tension, stimulating the audience and opening their curiosity and need to attend further.

Connectives are words or phrases that are used in to glue parts of the presentation together.

Transitioning can also be used when answering questions, as you close down one person with a response and open the door to the next questioner. This is an effective way of keeping things moving and avoiding being trapped by one person who wants to hog your attention (or maybe the limelight).

See also

Steering the conversation

 

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