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Think Right

 

Techniques Willpower > Think Right

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

A way of developing willpower is to pay attention to what goes on in your head, seeking to think good and rational thoughts rather than just giving in to subconscious desires.

There are also many ways by which we think in ill-disciplined ways that are more about protecting the ego than in living a high-integrity life.

Ways to think right include:

  • When you are tempted to do something, pause to think things through.
  • Avoid blaming others. It is much easier to point the finger than take responsibility.
  • Be truthful, even when you feel that it would be difficult for you if you did this.
  • Go out of your way to help other people, well before they have to ask.
  • Be open to new ideas, even if they directly conflict with your current beliefs.

Example

A person tends to react quickly to others, often  just jumping in rather than considering both what is said and the feelings of those around them. They learn to pause for a couple of seconds in order to do some reflection before responding.

A student joins a debating club in order to develop their ability to think well. They find that when their ideas are not in line, they are quickly taken to task.

Discussion

We often speak without thinking much. particularly when others are also speaking quickly. The discipline of thinking before we speak is hence rather uncommon.

The benefit of thought before speech is very useful in many ways. First, it lets you find a better argument. It also reduces the chance of you looking stupid. You then have the chance to consider the impact of your words on other people. People will hence be less likely to criticize you for what you say and will think you more intelligent and thoughtful.

We think much faster than we talk, which helps us get to better words quite quickly. It is hence surprising how much even a few seconds can improve what you say.

See also

Argument, Miller's Law

 

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