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Self-reports

 

Disciplines > Human Resources > Job Analysis > Self-reports

Description | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Understand how a job works by asking the incumbents to report themselves on aspects of the work.

One way is to keep a diary, noting down what they are doing when. This may include noting of exception activity and issues that are not a normal part of the job. Notes can also include thoughts and concerns and even ideas for improving the job (if that is something in which you are interested).

Self-reports may also be more structured, for example using check sheets to capture repeating events such as numbers and topics of phone calls. These may be used to analyze the processes involved, for example giving indication of loading factors over time.

Discussion

Self-reports are relatively easy to create and operate, but do assume that the workforce who are using them are both cooperative and honest. Whenever people are asked to tell others about their own work, then suspicions may arise and adjustment of responses made accordingly.

As the self-reporter is effectively an amateur, what is offered must be seen in this light. A certain amount of work may also be done beforehand in which their skills in this area are developed. Structured forms may also be used to reduce problems and going off-track.

Self-reports do require a certain amount of work afterwards, particularly if the format is relatively open and qualitative.

As with many other approaches, they work well when used in combination with other methods to give a broader picture and reinforce or challenge other findings.

See also

 

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