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Tortoise Strategy

 

Explanations > Politics > Political campaigns > Tortoise Strategy

Description | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Be steady, sure and unstoppable. Start off your campaign slowly, building power and intensity as you go, saving the barnstormer until just before the election.

Build a strong platform based on real issues and social concerns that may not grab the headlines but with which the electorate will generally agree. Put feet on the street and meet tirelessly with local people, quietly and carefully listening to concerns and putting across your message.

Be seen to be reliable, cautious, caring and strong. Frame your policies as good and right, not trite and empty. Let the contrast between you and your louder opponents be seen as a strength.

As your support grows, steadily step up the pace, as if you are encouraged and energized by your supporters. As the election looms make appearances at larger venues and with more invigorating and passionate speeches.

Discussion

In the classic fable, the tortoise and the hare have a race which the tortoise wins by steady plodding. Steadiness in politicians can be an admirable quality when the electorate is tired of show-business pizzazz and false smiles. When you are reliable and seem to genuinely care, you build trust.

When escalating, it is important to keep your supporters loyal by staying consistent and holding true to the strong but steady image you have been building from the start. Build up in a curve, not a straight line ramp, with most of the new energy coming near the end of the campaign.

One benefit of this strategy is that it can cost significantly less, although you still need to put 'quiet funds' into building local support.

See also

Power, Trust

 

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