changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

 

Disciplines

 

Techniques

 

Principles

 

Explanations

 

Theories

 

 

Home

 

Blog!

 

Quotes

 

Guest articles

 

Analysis

 

Books

 

Help us

 

Links

 

 

Please help
and share:

 

Cognitive Mechanisms

 

Explanations > Behaviors > Coping > Cognitive Mechanisms

Description | Example | Discussion | So what?

  

We cope with difficulties in various ways. Some are more positive than others. Here are various mental mechanisms that help us cope.

  • Aim Inhibition: lowering sights to what seems more achievable.
  • Altruism: Helping others to help self.
  • Avoidance: mentally or physically avoiding something that causes distress.
  • Compartmentalization: separating conflicting thoughts into separated compartments.
  • Conversion: subconscious conversion of stress into physical symptoms.
  • Denial: refusing to acknowledge that an event has occurred.
  • Displacement: shifting of intended action to a safer target.
  • Dissociation: separating oneself from parts of your life.
  • Fantasy: escaping reality into a world of possibility.
  • Idealization: playing up the good points and ignoring limitations of things desired.
  • Identification: copying others to take on their characteristics.
  • Intellectualization: avoiding emotion by focusing on facts and logic.
  • Introjection: Bringing things from the outer world into the inner world.
  • Passive Aggression: avoiding refusal by passive avoidance.
  • Projection: seeing your own unwanted feelings in other people.
  • Rationalization: creating logical reasons for bad behavior.
  • Reaction Formation: avoiding something by taking a polar opposite position.
  • Regression: returning to a child state to avoid problems.
  • Repression: subconsciously hiding uncomfortable thoughts.
  • Somatization: psychological problems turned into physical symptoms.
  • Suppression: consciously holding back unwanted urges.
  • Symbolization: turning unwanted thoughts into metaphoric symbols.
  • Trivializing: Making small what is really something big.

So what?

Mental mechanisms like this are sometimes deliberate and conscious and sometimes invisible to the person so they do not realize what is really happening. In the latter case it is difficult for a person to even begin to understand what is happening. A therapist or counsellor may be able to help them understand the inner processes and hence deliberately change how they think.

See also

Adaptive mechanisms, Anger

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Add/share/save:


 

 


Save the rain


 

 


SalesProCentral

 

Contact Caveat About Students Webmasters Awards Guestbook Feedback Sitemap Changes

 

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument

Brand management

* Change Management

Coaching
+
Communication

Counseling

Game Design

+ Human Resources

+ Job-finding

* Leadership

Marketing

Politics

+ Propaganda

+ Rhetoric

* Negotiation

* Psychoanalysis

* Sales

Sociology

+ Storytelling

+ Teaching

Warfare

Workplace design

 

Techniques

+ Assertiveness

* Body language

* Change techniques

* Closing techniques

+ Conversation

Confidence tricks

* Conversion

* Creative techniques

* General techniques

+ Happiness

+ Hypnotism

+ Interrogation

* Language

+ Listening

* Negotiation tactics

* Objection handling

+ Propaganda

* Problem-solving

* Public speaking

+ Questioning

Using repetition

* Resisting persuasion

+ Self-development

Sequential requests

Stress Management

* Tipping

Using humor

* Willpower

Principles

+ Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors

+ Beliefs

Brain stuff

Conditioning

+ Coping Mechanisms

+ Critical Theory

+ Culture

Decisions

* Emotions

Evolution

Gender

+ Games

Groups

+ Identity

+ Learning

Meaning

Memory

Motivation

+ Models

* Needs

+ Personality

+ Power

* Preferences

+ Research

Relationships

+ SIFT Model

+ Social Research

Stress

+ Trust

+ Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list

* Theory types

 


  Changing Minds 2002-2013

  Massive Content -- Maximum Speed

TOP