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Set Induction

 

Explanations > Learning Theory > Set Induction

Theory | Discussion | So what

 

What

Set induction is about preparation, usually for a formal lesson. When the students are set, they are ready to learn ('are you set?'). Set induction is thus about getting them ready, inducing them into the right mind-set.

How

Sets are used before any new activity, from introduction of a new concept to giving homework. It is important in each set both to create clarity about what is expected happen (both what you will do and what they should do), and to create motivation for this to occur, with students being fully engaged in the learning.

Set induction can be done by such as:

  • Explaining potential benefits to the learner.
  • Giving clear instructions.
  • Describing what is going to happen.

The STEP acronym may be used to help remember what to do:

  • Start: Welcome the students, settle them down and gain attention.
  • Transact: Understand their expectations and explain yours. Link with previous learning.
  • Evaluate: Assess the gap between their expectations and current reality. Clarify any discrepancies for them.
  • Progress: Move on to the main body of learning.

Why

Perrott (1982) identified four purposes of set induction.

  1. Focusing attention on what is to be learned by gaining the interest of students.
  2. Moving from old to new materials and linking of the two.
  3. Providing a structure for the lesson and setting expectations of what will happen.
  4. Giving meaning to a new concept or principle, such as giving examples.

So what?

So if you are teaching, think about and prepare carefully for getting your students in the right state of mind to be ready to understand and learn.

See also

Perrott, E. ((1982). Effective Teaching: A Practical Guide to Improving Your Teaching, New York: Longman

 

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