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Moral Indignation

 

Techniques > Conversation techniques > Excuses > Moral Indignation

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Take the moral high ground. Be indignant that you are being accused, saying that you would never do such a thing and that it is shocking that anyone would think you might act in the way being suggested.

From that high moral position, you can then point at other people who are less moral and therefore more likely to have committed the sin than you.

You can also place yourself morally above the critic, making yourself even more qualified to criticize and denounce their underhand tactics.

Example

Do you know how many hours of work I do for charity? If you did, I don't think you'd be telling me what contribution I should be making.

Well if it was either Ray or me, you might remember Ray's record of failure. Compare that with what I have achieved and you'll know where to look.

So now you are setting yourself up as judge and jury. And what is your evidence? What prosecution? And are you that good? Shall we look at the skeletons in your cupboard? Yes, I know a thing or two about you...

Discussion

Society runs on a system of values that stress fair play and a morality that includes respect and consideration. Many accusations break these rules, giving you the opportunity to defend yourself and strike back.

When you reference social values you position yourself as an expert who can pronounce good and bad, right and wrong. Having occupied this particular 'hill', it makes it more difficult for others to take the same moral position. Even if they do, the debate about morality will then act as a convenient distraction.

See also

Values, Morals and Ethics

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