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Logical Empirical

 

Techniques General persuasionKellerman and Cole's 64 Strategies > Logical Empirical

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Get other people to agree to your argument by being logical.

Use careful reasoning that makes sense to the other person. Use evidence wherever you can. Challenge their argument (if they arguing against you), testing the validity of their data and showing the lack of logic in their reasoning.

Example

Customer research shows 50% of the ABX category would accept a 5% price increase. So let's do it.

You seem to be basing your argument on opinion. Let's look at the data. This shows a more realistic view.

The contract states that we cannot use chemical equipment here. So we'll have to move.

Discussion

Empiricism uses direct evidence, data and proven facts in argument, rather than opinion, fallacies and faulty reasoning. A good logical empirical persuasive statement is hence very difficult to deny unless the person resorts to emotional responses, lying or other untruth. It is also worth noting that in strict empiricism, reasoning is considered a dangerous path as this can stray into the use of opinion rather than proven fact. Reading academic papers shows the importance of proving pretty much every assertion you make.

In practice, we very seldom use strict logical rules in our arguments and they are very often based more on belief than proven facts and primary data. This is often good enough to help us get by, but it also leaves loopholes that can be used by others who are using more data.

Logical Empirical is the 40th of the 64 compliance-gaining strategies described by Kellerman and Cole.

See also

Argument, Social Research

 

Kellermann, K. & Cole, T. (1994). Classifying compliance gaining messages: Taxonomic disorder and strategic confusion. Communication Theory, 1, 3-60

 

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