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Personal Expertize

 

Techniques General persuasionKellerman and Cole's 64 Strategies > Personal Expertize

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Gain credibility with others by ensuring they understand how expert you are.

Talk about your experience. Mention some of the successes you have had, particularly linking relevant experiences to things that you may be doing for them.

As appropriate, also indicate how well qualified you are, highlighting important aspects such as subject, qualification level and university.

If you have the opportunity, demonstrate in a practical way how expert you are, for example by diagnosing or solving a problem they have. Use of technical language can also show your expertize.

You can also note how others have been impressed with your skills. Better yet, get those other people to independently praise you.

Example

I spent five years in software development and I can tell you that a recursive method will work fine here.

I'm very well qualified and keep getting headhunters calling me. I think I deserve a pay raise.

I know what I'm doing! Leave me along and I'll fix it.

Discussion

When we first meet people, we have no idea how expert they are. Given this, we may assume they are inexpert until they indicate otherwise. Sometimes we guess at a person's intelligence by the things that they say. An easy approach to fixing this is to tell them, although you may need to keep this relatively succinct when they may think you are just boasting or trying to belittle them.

Sometimes people do not realize how competent you are, and sometimes they forget. Reminding them of your knowledge, abilities and qualification can be a powerful lever to get them to believe you and accept what you say as being the truth.


Personal Expertize is the 47th of the 64 compliance-gaining strategies described by Kellerman and Cole.

See also

Trust

 

Kellermann, K. & Cole, T. (1994). Classifying compliance gaining messages: Taxonomic disorder and strategic confusion. Communication Theory, 1, 3-60

 

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