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What have you done that you are not proud of?

 

Disciplines > Job-finding > Interview questions > What have you done that you are not proud of?

The question | What they are looking for | How to answer | See also

 

The question

What have you done that you are not proud of?

Tell me of a time when you did something that made you feel proud.

What makes you feel proud?

What they are looking for

Rather than pride this question may be seeking shame and how it is triggered in you. This is often done through transgression of values, so the question may also be seeking to understand the personal values and standards that you hold.

It may also be seeking simple weaknesses, assuming that you are relatively open and your answer will expose areas in which you are less capable.

How to answer

Do not say that there is nothing that of which you are not proud -- this indicates that you are either not self-aware or that you are excessively arrogant. Do, however, ensure that the item to which you admit is not a critical requirement of the job.

I worked once in the gaming business. It didn't feel good to be contributing towards the suffering of compulsive gamblers.

Show also that you acted in a way to address the issue that you were facing, and did something of which you could be proud.

In the end, I decided to move to another company where I could make a more positive contribution.

It is often important to show that you are practical, and that personal values do not clash with company necessities.

I worked once on a product that I felt would not succeed in the marketplace. I discussed this with the marketing people, but they wanted to continue. I still gave it my best shot, but in the end it still failed. It was not a good feeling.

See also

What have you done that you are proud of?

Seven Deadly Sins

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