changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Agreeing the process

 

Disciplines > Negotiation > Activities > Agreeing the process

Explicit agreement | Implicit definition | Returning to the process | See also

 

The process by which you negotiate will affect the outcome of the negotiation, which effectively makes the process something that may itself need to be independently negotiated, although it seldom is.

There is a wide spectrum of negotiation styles that you can use, each of which may use very different processes.

Explicit agreement

In an explicit agreement of how you will negotiate, this discussion typically starts up-front, before you get to any substantive elements of the negotiation.

In international negotiations, where there may be many parties involved, this includes everything from the location and seating to the shape of the table, times of day and how agreements will be ratified.

For individual negotiations, being explicit may well mean starting out by saying 'Let's agree how we are going to go about this' and then discussing elements such as how important the relationship is, the importance of fair play, and whether agreement is needed to be reached today.

Implicit definition

Start as you mean to continue.

 

.

Returning to the process

The process need not be agreed in detail up-front and agreements about how things are done may be brought up at any time.

Discussing one stage at a time

One way of managing discussions about negotiation is to discuss each stage of the process as you come to it. For this, you will need to break the process down into stages which can be easily discussed. The ten-stage negotiation process, may well be too many stages for such a breakdown, and it is usually better to identify fewer stages, such as opening, bargaining and agreeing.

 

Initial overview, later depth

Responding to deceptive tactics

If the process is implicit, then it may be made explicit at any time, especially if the other person is using tactics which you find disagreeable. This is an effective response to deceptive tactics. Naming the game and discussing how the negotiation is being conducted will often shame people into more collaborative approaches.

See also

.

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

You can buy books here

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Look inside

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

* Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-
Massive Content — Maximum Speed