changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Synchrony and Cooperation

 

Explanations > Groups > Synchrony and Cooperation

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

When groups of people do things together, particularly when their actions and words are the same, they feel closer to one another and so become more cooperative.

The synchronous action can be singing, dancing, swimming, running, working and so on. It works better when it includes a repetitive element.

Example

Religious groups and football crowds sing and chant together.

Armies march their troops up and down, all stepping together.

People walking or running together in a group tend to unconsciously fall into step with one another.

Tai Chi and other martial groups all perform the flowing forms or kata together.

Discussion

Similarity is one of the bases of trust. Similarity in words and action assumes similarity of thoughts and feelings and so creates an extension of the person's sense of identity.

Repetition hammers home a point. If the synchrony is repeated, the similarity is emphasized and hence there is an increase in conscious and unconscious recognition of the linkage with others, so ensuring a strengthened bond is created.

McNeill (1995) described 'muscular bonding' created from physically coordinated activity such as marching or dancing. Wiltermuth and Heath (2009) considered ways of overcoming the social loafing 'free-rider' effect, where people in group do not pull their weight, letting others do more of the work. They found that after getting groups to act in synchrony (walking in step in a stroll around the college campus, or singing and moving a cup), there was greater collaboration, including when individuals were asked to sacrifice their own interests for those of the group.

There are clear implications for changing minds in the way that groups can be brought together faster and more reliably by getting them to act in harmony in a wide range of ways.

See also

Bonding principle, Similarity principle, Building Rapport, Using repetition

 

McNeill, W.H. (1995). Keeping together in time: Dance and drill in human history. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Wiltermuth, S. S. & Heath, C. (2009). Synchrony and cooperation. Psychological Science, 20, 1-5

 

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

You can buy books here

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Look inside

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

* Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-2016
Massive Content — Maximum Speed