changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Pointers Direct Movement

 

Explanations > Perception > Visual Perception > Pointers Direct Movement

Description | Example | Discussion | So what?

 

Description

Anything that points in any way will cause the eyes to move in the pointed direction. Pointers include:

  • Arrow heads on the end of line
  • A line without an arrow where the direction is clear (as indicated by such as opacity, width, hue or coming from the corner of an image)
  • A pointing finger, arm or even leg or foot
  • A person gazing in a given direction
  • Signposts on roads
  • Movement (in a video)

Example

An marketing image has a person looking at the marketed product. Viewers are hence direct to also look at the image.

A road sign has a chevron shape at the end, giving a visual cue to where a driver should look and hence drive.

Discussion

When we look at an image, we look for cues as to where our eyes should go. Arrows and other pointers tell us where to look. We will even follow vague suggestions when there is no better option. Note how this also indicates that, when there is a choice, stronger pointers will be followed before weaker pointers.

Having people looking at a product is a common principle in marketing. When the image is static, even if the viewer looks away at other things, the person in the image will still suggest that we should look again at the image. In this way, a static image that provides cues will continue to do so, even if we have already obeyed the cue.

So what?

Think about where you want people to look. Then include pointers in the right direction. These may be subtle, such as a gaze, or bold, such as a big red arrow (adverts are known to use both). In a reverse sense, avoid having pointers that point away from a key subject unless you intend the viewer to move from the subject to somewhere else.

See also

Eye Extrapolates Line

 

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

You can buy books here

More Kindle books:

And the big
paperback book


Look inside

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

* Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-
Massive Content — Maximum Speed