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Extraversion vs. Introversion

 

Explanations > Preferences > Extraversion vs. Introversion

Extraversion | Introversion | So what?

 

Extraversion and Introversion are one of the preferences used in the Jungian Type Inventory. The naming is unfortunately a bit archaic as extraversion is not about being loud and introversion is not about being shy. It is about where people get their energy and motivation from: other people or within themselves.

Extraversion

The energy of extraverts is outward, towards people and things. They need a lot of stimulation and often express emotions. They get their motivation from other people.

Their often want to change the world (rather than think about it). Extraverts like variety, action and achievement. They do well at school but may find University more difficult.

Their attitude is often relaxed and confident. They are understandable and accessible. They tend to act first and think later.

At work, they seeks variety and action and like working with other people. They prefer work that has breadth rather than depth.

Introverts may see them as being shallow and pushy.

Introversion

The energy of introverts is inward toward concepts and ideas. They need little external stimulation - and in fact they can easily be over-stimulated. it is possible that they focus more on their inner worlds because they suffer from sensory overload if they spend too much time outside and focusing on other people. They thus bottle up their own emotions, which can explode if pushed too far.

Rather than trying to change the world, they just want to understand it. They think deeply about things and often do better at University than they did at school.

Their attitude is reserved and questioning and they can seem subtle and impenetrable. They tend to think before they act.
At work they like to work alone and often seek quiet for concentration. They tend to prefer work that has depth rather than breadth.

Extraverts may see them as egocentric and passive.

There is a view that introverts may act as they do because they are more easily overwhelmed by external stimuli, as opposed to extraverts who have a higher basic stimulation threshold and need the more visceral external stimulation to avoid boredom.

So what?

With extraverts:

  • Show energy and enthusiasm.
  • Respond quickly without long pauses to think.
  • Allow talking out loud without definite conclusions.
  • Communicate openly - do not censure.
  • Focus on the external world, the people and the things.
  • Allow time for bouncing around ideas.
  • Take words at face value.
  • Do not assume commitment or decisions made.

With introverts:

  • Include introduction time to get to know you and trust you.
  • Encourage responses with questions as, “What do you think?”
  • Use polling techniques for input and decision making.
  • Allow time for thinking before responding and decision-making.
  • Make use of written responses where practical.
  • Concentrate on one-on-one activities.
  • Do not assume lack of interest.

See also

Jungian Type Inventory

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