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Subjective vs. objectivity preferences

 

Explanations > Preferences > Subjective vs. objectivity preferences

Subjective perception | Objective perception | So what?

 

Think of a time when you were having fun. As you think about it, are you seeing the experience through your own eyes (subjective view), or can you see your body as if you are outside of it (objective view)?

The population is fairly evenly split between those who naturally take an objective view and those who take a subjective view. 

Subjective perception

Those with a naturally subjective view tend to be more emotional, as they think and remember their life very experientially. They also tend to live 'in the railroad tracks', meeting the future head-on, feeling 'done to' rather than being in control. Their experiential view will make them more empathetic and intuitive. 

Given the right encouragement, they also tend to be more easily empathetic with other people, as they are more accustomed to experiencing the agonies and the ecstasies of the subjective life.

Objective perception

People who see life more objectively prefer to stand back. This does not mean they are disinterested, only that they find the objective viewpoint a preferable place to be. Perhaps they find the subjective stance too painful or perhaps they find it too biased and untruthful of the whole picture. Whatever their reasons, they prefer to see things from a more disconnected, rational, unemotional viewpoint.

People with objective viewpoint are sometimes easier to persuade, as they can see things from your viewpoint too. However, they are more rational in their approach and may be good negotiators themselves. Negotiating on objective terms is, after all, playing on their natural territory.

So what?

For the subjective perceiver, talk in experiential terms, about what happens to them and how they feel. Empathize with them and get them to empathize with your subject.

For the objective person, be more detached, talking more in passive judgmental terms. Position yourself as standing beside them, watching the world.

 

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