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Thinking vs. Feeling

 

Explanations > Preferences > Thinking vs. Feeling

 | So what?

 

Thinking and Feeling are one of the preferences used in the Jungian Type Inventory. The naming is unfortunately a bit archaic as thinking is more than thought, and feeling is not about being over-emotional or fluffy.

They are about how we decide: through logic or through considering people.

Thinking

Thinkers decide based primarily on logic, and when they do so, they consider a decision to be made. They tend to see the world in black and white and dislike fuzziness.

Perhaps because people are so variable, they focus on tangible things, seeking truth and use of clear rules.

At work, they are task-oriented, seek to create clear value. Interacting with them tends to brief and business-like.

They may be seen as cold and heartless by Feelers.

 

Feeling

Feelers decide based primarily through social considerations, listening to their heart and considering the feelings of others.

They see life as a human existence and material things as being subservient to this. They value harmony and use tact in their interactions with others.

At work, they are sociable and people-oriented and make many decisions based on values (more than value).

They may be seen as unreliable and emotional by Thinkers.

So what?

With thinkers:

  • Be brief and concise.
  • Be logical; don’t ramble with no apparent purpose.
  • Be intellectually critical and objective.
  • Be calm and reasonable.
  • Don’t assume that feelings are unimportant; they may have a different value.
  • Present feelings and emotions as additional facts to be weighed in a decision.

With feelers:

  • Introduce yourself and get to know the person; full acceptance may take a considerable amount of time.
  • Be personable and friendly.
  • Demonstrate empathy by showing areas of agreement first.
  • Show how the idea will affect people and what people’s reaction would be.
  • Be aware that how you communicate is as important as what you’re communicating.
  • Let them talk about personal impact; accept decisions that may not be based on facts.

See also

Jungian Type Inventory

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