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Dump and Chase (DAC)

 

Techniques General Persuasion > Sequential Requests > Dump and Chase (DAC)

Description | Example | Discussion | See also

 

Description

Ask for something. When they flatly refuse, ask why (or why not, depending on how the situation is phrased).

Then turn the discussion into a negotiation whereby you remove the reasons for them not agreeing with you or otherwise complying with your request.

Example

When a customer says they do not want buy a product, the sales person asks what is stopping them from buying today, and then proceeds to address their issues.

A boy wants to go out with his friends. His mother says 'no'. He asks why not and then gives reasons and evidence that outweigh the mother's reasons. In the end, she gives in.

Discussion

There are two forms of refusal: a flat refusal where no explanation is given and and 'obstacle' where reasons are given for refusing. People often present obstacles as this is a more polite form and less likely to result in reactive argument. However, this form also gives space for the persuader to continue persuading.

Persistence by the persuader allows them to wear down the other person, who also may become convinced that this is an urgent and important matter for the persuader. The person may feel guilty in holding out when conceding is not that important for them, or become sympathetic to their need.  

This method pulls on the needs to explain, effectively forcing the other person to give reason, which also enables the persuader to continue.

'Dump and chase' is also a strategy in ice hockey whereby a team hits the puck into the attacking zone, then aggressively tries to retrieve it (which is similar to 'kick and rush' in rugby union). This term was used

See also

Negotiation, Objection-handling techniques and methods

Boster, F. J., Hughes, M. , Strom, R. E., Kotowski, M. , Shaw, A. , Kato, C. and Deatrick, L. Dump-and-Chase: The Effectiveness of Persistence as a Compliance-Gaining Strategy. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY Online <PDF> Retrieved 2008-02-03 from

http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p12211_index.html

 

http://msu.edu/~breedsm/doc/aspaper2.doc

 

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