changingminds.org

How we change what others think, feel, believe and do

| Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings |

Inquiry Arousal

 

Explanations > Motivation > Perceptual Arousal

Description | Example | Discussion | So what?

 

Description

Inquiry arousal is the state of arousal where we seek to find out more, typically where a stimulus has piqued our curiosity.

Curiosity can be provoked by the use of:

  • Incongruity: Where experience and mental models do not match.
  • Interest: Where opportunity is presented to achieve goals.
  • Incompletion: Where only partial information is provided.
  • Conflict: Where differences are accentuated.

These can be presented through challenges that may be posed through:

  • Questions: Which stimulate new thinking.
  • Problems: Which need thought to solve.
  • Humor: Which requires thought to understand.
  • Debate: Where arguments are made for given positions.
  • Role-play: Where they take the part of defined characters.

Example

A science teacher shows a chemical reaction and then asks the class to suggest what may be going on.

A sales person takes a person for a drive in a car they have said they do not like, yet it seems to perform better than they expected. They hence want to know more about the car, which gives the sales person opportunity to overcome their initial bias.

A soap opera finishes with some bad news, though this is not explicitly described. Viewers hence want to watch the next episode to find out what this is.

Discussion

To become curious requires that the person is reasonably confident with basic needs met and little or no fear nor excessive stress. If the person is overloaded or fears overload, then they will avoid novelty and not be curious.

Likewise, if they feel threatened then they will be more concerned to protect themselves than inquire and explore new areas.

There is hence a 'zone of curiosity' in which the possibility of discovery is more attractive than the possibility of distress. A curious person will approach rather than avoid a novel situation, seeing it as interesting rather than threatening.

So what?

Provoke curiosity through the methods above, but do be careful about overloading the person or otherwise causing stress that leads them to defend their selves rather than become curious.

See also

Risk Bias, Creating Cognitive Arousal

 

Keller, J.M. (2010). Motivational Design for Learning and Performance: The ARCS Model Approach, Springer

 

Site Menu

| Home | Top | Quick Links | Settings |

Main sections: | Disciplines | Techniques | Principles | Explanations | Theories |

Other sections: | Blog! | Quotes | Guest articles | Analysis | Books | Help |

More pages: | Contact | Caveat | About | Students | Webmasters | Awards | Guestbook | Feedback | Sitemap | Changes |

Settings: | Computer layout | Mobile layout | Small font | Medium font | Large font | Translate |

 

 

Please help and share:

 

Quick links

Disciplines

* Argument
* Brand management
* Change Management
* Coaching
* Communication
* Counseling
* Game Design
* Human Resources
* Job-finding
* Leadership
* Marketing
* Politics
* Propaganda
* Rhetoric
* Negotiation
* Psychoanalysis
* Sales
* Sociology
* Storytelling
* Teaching
* Warfare
* Workplace design

Techniques

* Assertiveness
* Body language
* Change techniques
* Closing techniques
* Conversation
* Confidence tricks
* Conversion
* Creative techniques
* General techniques
* Happiness
* Hypnotism
* Interrogation
* Language
* Listening
* Negotiation tactics
* Objection handling
* Propaganda
* Problem-solving
* Public speaking
* Questioning
* Using repetition
* Resisting persuasion
* Self-development
* Sequential requests
* Storytelling
* Stress Management
* Tipping
* Using humor
* Willpower

Principles

+ Principles

Explanations

* Behaviors
* Beliefs
* Brain stuff
* Conditioning
* Coping Mechanisms
* Critical Theory
* Culture
* Decisions
* Emotions
* Evolution
* Gender
* Games
* Groups
* Habit
* Identity
* Learning
* Meaning
* Memory
* Motivation
* Models
* Needs
* Personality
* Power
* Preferences
* Research
* Relationships
* SIFT Model
* Social Research
* Stress
* Trust
* Values

Theories

* Alphabetic list
* Theory types

And

About
Guest Articles
Blog!
Books
Changes
Contact
Guestbook
Quotes
Students
Webmasters

 

| Home | Top | Menu | Quick Links |

© Changing Works 2002-2016
Massive Content — Maximum Speed