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The Need to Work

 

Explanations > Needs > The Need to Work

Need | Example | Related to | Discussion |  So what?

 

 

Need

While some are lazy, most people have a deep drive to keep working, even if they have no financial need to do so.

Example

A millionaire who could relax at home is driven to keep going to the office, working longer hours than other people.

A retired person who is comfortably off continues working, in their garden, as a volunteer and in other hobbies. 

Related to

 

 

Discussion

This can be seen in those who have achieved great success and made enough money to live comfortably for the rest of their lives, yet still get up early and go to work. Similarly, retired people seldom do nothing. In fact they are often so busy it is common for them to wonder how they ever had time to go to work.

As well as making money and helping us achieve our goals, work creates structure and meaning in our lives. It gets us out of bed in the morning. It fills our days and prevents boredom. It also offers a social setting where we can interact with others, find friends and gain status.

The reason many people do not like work is because the work they do does not challenge them (or perhaps challenges them too much). If we are bored, exhausted or stressed at work then it may not seem that much fun.

There is a curious work-play paradox which is explained by our need to work. When we are at work, we dream of holidays and lying idly on the beach. Yet when we get there, we feel bored and start thinking about work. The need to work is drive by the push away from boredom as well as the pull of success.

So what?

Use boredom as a threat and interesting work as a promised reward.

Find out what people's work is (most are very happy to talk about it) and seek ways to make it more interesting or fun.

See also

Job Finding, Meaning

 

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