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Prod Their Motivators

 

Explanations > Perception > Attention > Prod Their Motivators

Description | Example | Discussion | So what?

 

Description

Provoke them by directly acting to stimulate their motivators. There are range of things that drive us, which leads to simple strategies to get them aroused. These include:

  • Needs: Deny them basic needs.
  • Beliefs: Challenge what they hold as true.
  • Models: Give a view contrary to how they understand the world.
  • Values: Show something that they will consider wrong or bad.
  • Preferences: Suggest something that they prefer and which plays to their strengths.
  • Stress: Push their stress levels up until they are forced to respond.
  • Interests: Offer something that is of general interest to them.
  • Goals: Show how what they seek to achieve is threatened (or how they can achieve these goals).

Example

A teacher gets the attention of a class by criticizing a pop group. Some agree with the criticism while others vehemently defend the pop stars. The teacher then orchestrates a debate where either side is asked to substantiate their assertions.

A sales person extends a customer's interests by showing them a sports car that they had not previously considered.

A child cries until they over-stress their parent who eventually gives into the child's requests.

Discussion

We are driven by a range of motivators that have a significant effect on how we behave. Interventions in this process will cause pain or pleasure and, very often close attention to the source of the interruption. Challenges to needs, beliefs, models and values are almost always stressful and painful and consequently cause a sharp reaction that seeks to reduce the challenge. Actions that stimulate interests and goals that attract people will often cause more positive attention that seeks more.

So what?

Do not just go jerking people around without knowing the effects you will have. Prodding motivators needs to be done subtly so you get just the attention that you are seeking.

See also

Arousal Thresholds

 

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